Anti-Counterfeiting Measures in the Pharmaceutical Industry

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The Future of Anti-Counterfeiting Measures in the Pharmaceutical Industry.

Veritech The Future of Anti-Counterfeiting Measures in the Pharmaceutical Industry.

June 7

The Future of Anti-Counterfeiting Measures in the Pharmaceutical Industry.

What is Anti-Counterfeiting?

Anti-counterfeiting refers to the methods and tactics used to stop the manufacture, sale, and distribution of imitation goods. The process of making and distributing false goods that are styled to resemble authentic, original goods is known as counterfeiting. Numerous items, such as apparel, accessories, electronics, and pharmaceuticals, can be counterfeit products. Anti-counterfeiting methods are employed to safeguard consumers from the potential harm that comes from using fake goods as well as to safeguard the rights and income of the real intellectual property owners. Holograms, security inks, and RFID tags are a few examples of technological solutions that can be used in combination with legal and regulatory safeguards like trademark and patent protection, customs enforcement, and criminal prosecution of counterfeiters.

Need for anti-counterfeit technologies

The pharmaceutical sector faces a big problem with counterfeiting because it not only threatens the profits of legal manufacturers but also the patient’s health and safety. In order to fight this problem, the industry has been actively inventing and putting into practice numerous anti-counterfeiting solutions.

Some of the upcoming anti-counterfeiting measures the pharmaceutical sector is likely to use include the following:

1. Utilising blockchain technology By offering an unchangeable and transparent record of every transaction in the supply chain, blockchain technology has the potential to completely transform the pharmaceutical sector. This technology makes it more challenging for counterfeiters to insert phony drugs into the supply chain by tracking the transit of medications from the manufacturer to the patient.

2. Authentication technologies: Holograms, color-shifting inks, and RFID tags are just a few of the authentication technologies that can be employed to confirm the legitimacy of medications. As these technologies advance and become more affordable, smaller producers will have easier access to them.

3. Serialisation: Serialisation is the process of utilizing a serial number or barcode to identify individual medicine packages in a specific way. The supply chain may be tracked and authenticated using this technology, making it more challenging for counterfeiters to make fake pharmaceuticals.

4. Mobile applications: By scanning a QR code or barcode on the package, mobile applications can be used to check the legitimacy of medications. These apps can also offer details about the medication, such as dosage recommendations and any side effects.

To tackle the issue of counterfeit medications, the pharmaceutical industry is expected to implement a combination of these anti-counterfeiting techniques in the future. These restrictions will safeguard patient safety and well-being and the earnings of legal manufacturers.

The public’s health and safety are seriously threatened by counterfeit pharmaceuticals on a global scale. Up to 10% of medicines in low- and middle-income countries are thought to be fake or subpar, according to the World Health Organisation (WHO), which results in an estimated 100,000 fatalities per year. Although counterfeit drugs are a major issue in developing nations, they are also a major problem in the United States. Anti-counterfeiting procedures must be created and put into place in order to protect patient safety and preserve the integrity of the supply chain as the pharmaceutical business expands and changes.

Anti-counterfeiting measures have been in place for many years, with some of the earliest examples including the use of holograms and watermarks on the packaging. However, these measures have proven to be insufficient as counterfeiters have become increasingly sophisticated in their methods. In response, the pharmaceutical industry has begun to adopt new technologies and strategies to combat counterfeiting.

Utilizing authentication technologies, such as color-changing inks and other challenging-to-replicate security features, is another tactic. These characteristics may aid in discouraging counterfeiters from producing accurate imitations of medicinal items. It’s crucial to remember, though, that using authentication methods by itself won’t be enough to stop counterfeiting; additional actions must be taken.

Although these methods and technologies show great promise for the future of anti-counterfeiting measures in the pharmaceutical sector, there are still issues that need to be resolved. The expense of putting these protections into place is one of these obstacles. The usage of serialization, RFID tagging, and other technology can be pricey, especially for smaller businesses that might not have the same financial means as bigger pharmaceutical organizations.

The need for international cooperation in the fight against counterfeiting is another obstacle. Since counterfeiter’s cross borders, it is challenging to find and prosecute them. In order to effectively combat counterfeiting, nations must collaborate and exchange resources and information.

When putting new anti-counterfeiting measures into place, privacy issues must also be taken into consideration. RFID tags and other supply chain tracking technologies have the ability to gather private information about individuals and their medical history. The privacy rights of the patients must be maintained as well as the secure collection and storage of this data.

Future for Anti-Counterfeiting Packaging

Though current efforts to combat fake medications through inventive packaging methods are still in their infancy, future prospects appear bright. As the president of the Packaging Management Institute, Ben Miyares, notes, “Nanotechnology remains a great, largely untapped technology for improving the efficacy, purity, and quality of pharmaceutical and medical device packaging.” Therefore, while the issue of fake pharmaceuticals is still getting worse, technological advancements are making it harder for counterfeiters.

The good news in this circumstance, according to Richard Adams, head of Pack Graphic Design at GlaxoSmithKline in Durham, North Carolina, “is the number of new technologies available to pharmaceutical companies.” There are numerous options, and more are being developed annually. It appears that the fight against fake goods is just getting started.

Implementing anti-counterfeiting procedures might be difficult

There are issues that need to be resolved even though these techniques and techniques show considerable promise for the future of anti-counterfeiting measures in the pharmaceutical business. The expense of putting these safeguards into effect is one such difficulty. For smaller businesses that might not have the same resources as bigger pharmaceutical corporations, the usage of RFID tagging, serialization, and other technologies might be expensive. This might make it difficult for some businesses to enter the market and prevent the broad use of these technologies.

The need for international cooperation in the fight against counterfeiting is another obstacle. Since counterfeiters cross borders, it is challenging to find and prosecute them. In order to effectively combat counterfeiting, nations must collaborate and exchange resources and information.

When putting new anti-counterfeiting measures into place, privacy issues must also be taken into consideration. RFID tags and other supply chain tracking technologies have the ability to gather private information about individuals and their medical history.

The privacy rights of the patients must be maintained as well as the secure collection and storage of this data. The future of anti-counterfeiting solutions in the pharmaceutical business is bright despite these obstacles. As technology develops further, new ways to stop counterfeiting will become available.